Early Autumn Apples–Naming Names

When you think autumn, do you think apples? I do, and am heading to the orchard today. More soon but, in the meantime, here’s what I had to say last autumn!

Love Those "Hands at Home"

IMG_3133It is remarkable how closely the history of the apple tree is connected with that of man.Henry David Thoreau

Apples are synonymous with autumn in upstate New York. This is a place where farmers name their kids after apples—I swear I know a Cortland and a Macintosh but, though we joked about it, we never knew a girl named Delicious.

My great-uncle and aunt owned an orchard so I have apples in my genetic structure. They had just one of dozens of commercial orchards in the area that offer many varieties of apples, some you’ve never heard of, as well as hard and soft cider, apple cider donuts, apple pies, apple picking and all other manner of fall fun. (Let’s be clear, my people never made hard cider, though their descendant likes to drink it!)

Did you know that apples can’t be reliably grown from seed? You might…

View original post 795 more words

Advertisements

17 thoughts on “Early Autumn Apples–Naming Names

  1. Oh. A post after my own heart. When I was a child, the march into Autumn was punctuated by the changing apple season: Discovery, to James Grieve, to Laxton Superb, to my very favourite Russet, which always associate with Bonfire Night. And so on, and so on. These days, even at the height of the apple growing season here (and our climate is just perfect) the supermarket shelves are awash with French Golden Delicious (which aren’t delicious at all), Australian Pink Lady, South African Jonagold, apples from New Zealand, the USA, Italy….. (can you see you’ve touched a nerve here?). Almost only Coxes and Bramleys from England are regularly marketed. And it’s so sad. Many of our varieties are almost lost forever. And now I read you have the same issues over there. I’ve just found this article, which may interest you: http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2013/04/heritage-apples-john-bunker-maine.
    Rant over. Sorry………

    • What an amazing article! Thank you for sharing that! It gives me such hope to read about people like Bunker and to know that there’s an effort to keep these old varieties alive. I read an article awhile ago, and now I have to remember where, about someone doing similar work in Kazakhstan, I think, trying to keep varieties of ancient mother-of-all apples alive. And PS–I love that you rant about apples!

  2. We went to an apple orchard last week-end. I was hoping to get some Cortland apples (a wonderful older variety that I think was developed in New York), but they’d already sold out of them, so we bought some Honeycrisps and Harralsons.

    • And we were just at an orchard that had huge bins of Cortlands! My mom’s best friend, the wife of an apple grower here, named her son Cortland. 🙂 I’ve never heard of Harralsons, though!

  3. Must be fun to take a trip to an orchard. My favourite apples are the Dutch Elstars, I think they are the most common ones over here. I love tossing them in a salad with lettuce, black olives, feta cheese, a red union and tomatoes 🙂

  4. Can’t wait to hear more about your apple trip and the varieties you tasted and bought this time. As you know I am a huge fan of New York apples. It was good to re read your post from last year; still makes my mouth water.

    • You’ve been so loyal, for a year now! Thank you for that! We got such a cool variety of apples on that recent trip–maybe 8 different types, several of which we’d never heard of before! It’s going to take a little time to work my way through them!

  5. ohoh, Kerry, for some reason a number of my favorite blogs were unfollowed..but not by me! I thought it was a little strange I did not see new posts from you! phew, good thing I checked. I am going enjoy this catch up!
    Well and apples..the most joyuos of fruits and cooking with them: sweet and hearty, always good. And oh my, so beautiful to look at too. And the smell…the ultimate autumnal experience!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s