Today, for Show and Tell

IMG_3789“Now, Kerry, it’s your turn. What did you bring for Show and Tell?”

Show and Tell? I loved Show and Tell!! Showing off was disapproved of at our house when I was a kid but, once in awhile, at school, we were allowed—nay, encouraged—to show off. At those times, showing off was an officially sanctioned event.

Some days I feel like I’m using my blog the same way—as an opportunity to show off a little, under the guise of waxing rhapsodic about all things handmade.

And today is one of those days!

I’ve already gotten a lot of blog miles out of my green striped dishtowels. You’ve all been so patient and attentive in the past, that I’m trotting them out one more time. They’re finally finished, hemmed and everything, and I’ve taken the glamour shots.

These were the towels that got me so excited because I was able to weave four different patterns after threading the loom just once. It doesn’t take all that much to make a new weaver happy!IMG_3790

At the end, when I had the three planned towels done, I changed the weft (horizontal thread) color from off-white to green. Again, this changed the look of the patterns hugely.IMG_3784

I also tried hemstitching for the first time. This is a finishing technique that is done while the fabric is still on the loom. The effect is neat and tidy, and reminiscent of the vintage linens I handle all the time. I’ll be using it a lot!IMG_3788

The towels aren’t perfect, of course. They are too small for my taste and I did the hems on the sewing machine and I still haven’t reached détente with my sewing machine.

But, they have far fewer mistakes than the last set of towels I made, I tried some new techniques, and I got a sense the possibilities on my little four-harness loom. It’s all good!

Sigh. Show and Tell is over for today. Now it’s time for Reading Circle and Arithmetic . . . and recess! I loved recess!

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62 thoughts on “Today, for Show and Tell

  1. I love what you brought to Show and Tell! Clapping 🙂 showing off was never allowed in our home , but we were allowed to display our creativity , displaying handmade things are a inspiration. Oh yes.. I loved recess!

  2. “…aren’t perfect…” Are you kidding? I’m amazed by your talent and attention to detail. Brava!

    I don’t remember offering much in the way of Show and Tell. I looked forward to it but it seemed like the same kids were up there showing off something that their parents gave them. You, on the other hand, here, have wonderful stories to tell.

  3. Marvelous! I love the hemstitched edge. Will you use these towels? I WOULD!!! 😀

    I don’t remember show and tell in school as a regular thing. I do love that part of my monthly quilt guild meeting. Seeing what others do and hearing about why they made the choices they did helps BIND them to the rest of us. They tell stories about memorial quilts, wedding quilts, grandbaby quilts, using-up-all-my-purples quilts, inspirations from classes or friends or patterns or kits. We know more about them and we care about them and their lives more. It is HUMAN to want that attachment with others. Show and tell helps give us that. 🙂

    • Thanks, Melanie! I think I will use them . . .I hope I do. Your comments about sharing what we make are excellent–have you written a blog post on this subject? You should!

  4. How could you hold the ending of the weaving towel story from us? Of course you needed to share with us! I love hearing the details, this is the perfect Show and Tell! There was drama, suspense, love, all the makings of the perfect series of posts! And the end was perfection. Mistakes, hardly, those are just educational moments! Your towels came out beautifully. I really love the fringed treatment (hem stitching). Can we go back to art class and you can share more!

    • I’ll keep sharing my weaving, if you’ll keep sharing your watercolors! I love the hemstitching, too, but I’ve read that it actually shouldn’t be used on towels because the fringe won’t hold up well to all the washing and drying that towels endure. But I’m going to use it on EVERYTHING else!

  5. We didn’t even get show and tell at school. 😦 But there was plenty of recess. Did you go out and throw snowballs today? The tea towels are beautiful. We had to make morning and afternoon tea for our teachers. That was in primary school. We had to wash the cups and saucers as well. Your tea towels would have been most useful for that task.

  6. When you have those thoughts about using your blog as a platform for “showing off,” just push them aside. We love to see what you’re up to and your love of all things handmade is an inspiration. Class dismissed.

  7. I can totally appreciate all that has gone into the making of these!!!! Next to ‘blue’, ‘green’ is my fave and these fill the bill! Playing with color is amazing…hmmmmmm????? Good job!!!!! (as we say to the “kids”…hehehe)

    • Yes, the color play with weaving is so cool and so different than quilting because of the way the threads interlace. I downloaded software today, to help with the planning, and it’s pretty addictive!

  8. One of the rewards of weaving is you can make several different patterns with one warp, which helps make up for the the pain of warping the loom. I’m so glad you’re having fun with all the possibilities.

    • You know, the actual dressing of the loom doesn’t bother me much but I really hate winding warp. I have one of those warping mills and i need to try that instead of the warping board. Maybe it’ll be easier–have you tried one?

  9. What wonderful towels! Thanks so much, Kerry, for sharing! I always think of show and tell as sharing something I’m excited about with someone else who can understand and join in the excitement. Keep sharing!

    • You’re right–when I worry about sharing my stuff, I need to remember how much I love seeing what others make. It’s one of the best parts about knowing people who make things!

    • That’s hard about weaving, isn’t it? I’m still constantly surprised with the way the colors interact and have a hard time predicting but I guess that’s part of the fun. Thanks for stopping by!

  10. Here in the UK I don’t think we had such a thing as show and tell…perhaps this is why I too like doing so on my blog.
    These are beautiful – I love the patterns and the colours and that edging is divine. More show and tell, please Kerry!

    • No show and tell? That’s sad. But I’m glad you’re making up for lost time! Like all other crafts, it’s the details in weaving that are so compelling. I had no idea!

    • Thanks, Susan! You know, I think about Etsy but I have finished so little weaving at this point I would have a bunch of candy, lots of vintage, and a couple measly towels. Maybe someday . . .

    • Remember glamour shots?! I wonder what ever happened to that industry. One thing I’ve learned, from selling vintage on Etsy, is how to take a picture that shows fabric to best advantage!

  11. They are truly wonderful and will be used forever! The colours remind me of pine cones and fur trees. PERFECT!! thanks for show and tell.

  12. you’ve already covered reading circle because you read blogs and wrote your own. The math, I can’t help you with, but my 12-year-old daughter is pretty smart in that 😉

    Your crafts(wo)manship blows me away. In my wildest dreams, I could never hope to make something so beautiful. Wow.

    • Well, you COULD do this. Truly–it just takes time, patience, and a good teacher. I’m pretty amazed at being able to weave such credible-looking items, when you think I haven’t been weaving even a year yet!

  13. lovely towels, such a satisfying feeling when you use them. my weaver’s guild has wonderful show and tell every month and my students get together every month for tea and tell. a fun way to share and inspire.

    • I wish I had a weaver’s guild to go to! There’s just nothing in this area. But my favorite part of quilt guild meetings is the show and tell so I’m sure I’d feel the same way about weaving.

  14. I wonder if that is why I blog – a form of ‘show and tell’ for the child who was too crippled to do so in school …… It was called ‘morning talks’ in my day and was dominated by the kids who led interesting lives and who got to go places and do things……… I loved school, but not morning talks!

    I count my progress towards becoming ‘an artist’ by the number of mistakes I can see in a work. Progress is a smaller number 🙂

    I am so aware that, in your case, every thread of fabric has been laid by your own hands and you are aware of every slight imperfection. My new eye sees the overall completed project and unaware of the w-i-p tally of errors says ‘that is perfectly beautiful’.

    In our blogging world showing our work proudly is absolutely allowed – encouraged in fact! Improvement is the reward of many hours spent honing our craft. I love everything about your towels – and you!

    • Pauline, you’re just the sweetest! You always say the right thing. In truth, I didn’t love show and tell all that much–every other girl brought her dolly and, while I had dollies, I didn’t see what made them right for show and tell. And I was a budding introvert and hated having all the attention on me. But, you’re right, it feels different here in our little blog world!

  15. I love how you changed the treadling every few inches on the green weft towel. I always do that too! I want to see all the variations RIGHT NOW, instead of waiting a whole two feet. Also, I hemstitch too, so I can use my towels the minute they are off the loom. Great job! I know you will enjoy them!

    • So, you hemstitch towels? I read somewhere that it wasn’t the best way to finish towels because the fringe doesn’t hold up to the washer and dryer and gets ratty. What’s your take on that? For my next project, I’m doing a sampler sort of thing from the Davison book, with 4 thread patterns and a million different treadlings. It’ll let me see the variations RIGHT NOW!

      • I guess the fringe does get a little ratty after 20 years or so, but then you could always cut a little off and re-hem. If I don’t hemstitch, they sit in a pile for years waiting for me to stitch them by machine. So I am both an impatient treadler and a procrastinating machine seamstress. An odd combination!

    • I don’t think my weaving is ready for primetime yet! Maybe someday I’ll put things on Etsy but, first, I have to be more confident that I’m getting things right!

  16. Wow, these are beautiful. It’s nice to be allowed into your ‘class’ so I can see what you’ve got for show and tell. It’s so amazing to see what people are doing and creating. The attraction of blogging is the creation of a community of interest that in many cases is much larger than we could have otherwise. It’s a lovely experience. Thanks again!

    • You’re right–I’ve read about so many things, on blogs, that I might not otherwise open myself up to. I tend to bond with a blogger and then go wherever she (or he) takes me!

  17. So glad you shared the finished towels. They are absolutely gorgeous! Give yourself a double pat on the back.

  18. I’m glad you’ve ‘shown and told’. But mentioning school made me realise why I’m so resistant to sewing. In primary school, all we ever every long Monday morning between break and lunch time was embroider tray cloths. We gossiped of course, and most weeks I had to pretend I’d achieved more than I actually had when we showed what we were supposed to have done that week. It was beyond boring. No wonder I hated needles and thread so much!

    • I can see why sewing is off-putting to you! There are some crafts that don’t appeal to me at ALL but that others love, like crocheting and knitting. Chacun a san gout, I guess!

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