An Interlude, Sunny and Warm

I am counting myself so fortunate.

To be able to get from this:

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Waves of snow on the frozen lake

to this:

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Waves of blue

with a three-hour flight.

To visit a spot where the blue of the cocktails echoes the blue of sea and sky.

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Margarita, the color of the sea

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Sea, the color of a Margarita

To visit a spot where the wildlife is exotic.

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And to visit a spot where the heat of the sun is exceeded only by the warmth of gathering with family.

I’m back home now, to snow flurries, the frozen lake, and a huge backlog of chores. But the warm and sunny interlude will carry me over. Here’s to hoping that you have sun and warmth in your heart this week!

A Week’s Worth of Handwovens from One Wonderful Warp: 7

Other elements of my life are infringing on my blog life this week. Instead of my usual very deep, incredibly insightful, humility-laden, and overly wordy posts, I am going to show you some glamour shots of the woven result of the long warp I’ve been thinking of as Rapunzel’s braid.

Day Seven—The Rosepath Pattern Sampler

IMG_4071This was the starting point for the whole project but it’s the piece that makes me happiest so I saved it for last.

The design is composed of a grid of 4 blocks by 13 blocks, creating 4-inch squares and representing 52 different patterns made possible by the way the loom is set-up at the beginning. Some are so similar it’s hard to see that they aren’t exactly the same. Some are very different. I like some; others don’t appeal.

But I have them, all in one place, to refer back to as I continue to weave! I developed skills, got to try some things that were new to me, worked in a finer thread, and with a much longer warp than I had.

I hemstitched both ends, an effect I love. The finished sampler is about 49 inches by about 15 inches, plus the fringe at two ends.

So, there you have it! Thanks for sticking around for this week’s worth of show and tell. Having someone to share this with makes weaving a lot more fun!

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Background:

The warp threads were 7.5 yards longs (a little less than 7 meters). They were mostly unbleached Cottolin, a mix of cotton and linen, with a few threads of dark blue to make vertical stripes.

The project started as a pattern sampler that creates a grid of four patterns across and thirteen patterns from top to bottom. By a combination of the way the loom is threaded and the ways the treadles are pushed, I could get many different patterns in one piece of fabric. For reasons I can’t explain, that makes me ever so happy.

For anyone REALLY interested, I got the pattern for this Rosepath Sampler from pages 16 and 17 in Marguerite Davison’s A Handweaver’s Pattern Book.

Once I was done the sampler portion of the project, I had enough warp left to make six dishtowels. I love dishtowels! I used a different treadling pattern on each one and played around with some different colors.

I’ll show a towel each day this week. On the seventh day, we won’t rest—I’ll show you the sampler, which turned out well enough to make me begin to feel like a real weaver!

I have lots of evidence of how kind and supportive you are, so don’t feel the need to comment every day on every towel!

A Week’s Worth of Handwovens from One Wonderful Warp: 6

IMG_4058Other elements of my life are infringing on my blog life this week. Instead of my usual very deep, incredibly insightful, humility-laden, and overly wordy posts, I am going to show you some glamour shots of the woven result of the long warp I’ve been thinking of as Rapunzel’s braid.

Day Six—Back to Basics

For the last towel, I wanted to see what would happen if I treadled differently than any of the patterns in the book I was using. I did the most basic pattern I could think of and ended up with a herringbone effect! So, in addition to the 52 patterns in the sampler (which you’ll see tomorrow!), I learned that other nice patterns can be created with this basic set-up of the loom.

I went back to colors that are the real me, and combined navy and dark green. Pretty in an understated way but even I think they could use something to perk them up!

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Background:

The warp threads were 7.5 yards longs (a little less than 7 meters). They were mostly unbleached Cottolin, a mix of cotton and linen, with a few threads of dark blue to make vertical stripes.

The project started as a pattern sampler that creates a grid of four patterns across and thirteen patterns from top to bottom. By a combination of the way the loom is threaded and the ways the treadles are pushed, I could get many different patterns in one piece of fabric. For reasons I can’t explain, that makes me ever so happy.

For anyone REALLY interested, I got the pattern for this Rosepath Sampler from pages 16 and 17 in Marguerite Davison’s A Handweaver’s Pattern Book.

Once I was done the sampler portion of the project, I had enough warp left to make six dishtowels. I love dishtowels! I used a different treadling pattern on each one and played around with some different colors.

I’ll show a towel each day this week. On the seventh day, we won’t rest—I’ll show you the sampler, which turned out well enough to make me begin to feel like a real weaver!

I have lots of evidence of how kind and supportive you are, so don’t feel the need to comment every day on every towel!

A Week’s Worth of Handwovens from One Wonderful Warp: 5

IMG_4047Other elements of my life are infringing on my blog life this week. Instead of my usual very deep, incredibly insightful, humility-laden, and overly wordy posts, I am going to show you some glamour shots of the woven result of the long warp I’ve been thinking of as Rapunzel’s braid.

Day Five—Wilder Yet, For Me!

I am not a pink person (or purple—don’t get me started). But I found this deep rose in the big bin and I love the way it looks with the navy!IMG_4050 IMG_4112

Background:

The warp threads were 7.5 yards longs (a little less than 7 meters). They were mostly unbleached Cottolin, a mix of cotton and linen, with a few threads of dark blue to make vertical stripes.

The project started as a pattern sampler that creates a grid of four patterns across and thirteen patterns from top to bottom. By a combination of the way the loom is threaded and the ways the treadles are pushed, I could get many different patterns in one piece of fabric. For reasons I can’t explain, that makes me ever so happy.

For anyone REALLY interested, I got the pattern for this Rosepath Sampler from pages 16 and 17 in Marguerite Davison’s A Handweaver’s Pattern Book.

Once I was done the sampler portion of the project, I had enough warp left to make six dishtowels. I love dishtowels! I used a different treadling pattern on each one and played around with some different colors.

I’ll show a towel each day this week. On the seventh day, we won’t rest—I’ll show you the sampler, which turned out well enough to make me begin to feel like a real weaver!

I have lots of evidence of how kind and supportive you are, so don’t feel the need to comment every day on every towel!

A Week’s Worth of Handwovens from One Wonderful Warp: 4

IMG_4038Other elements of my life are infringing on my blog life this week. Instead of my usual very deep, incredibly insightful, humility-laden, and overly wordy posts, I am going to show you some glamour shots of the woven result of the long warp I’ve been thinking of as Rapunzel’s braid.

Day Four—Kind of Wild, For Me

 

We have a lot of thread and yarn we bought when we bought our secondhand looms so I went looking through the bin for inspiration. On a gloomy, wintry day, I picked sunny yellow and combined it with the navy blue. I think I’d like it better with white weft thread to make it brighter but I’d run out of white at this point!

IMG_4040 IMG_4107Background:

The warp threads were 7.5 yards longs (a little less than 7 meters). They were mostly unbleached Cottolin, a mix of cotton and linen, with a few threads of dark blue to make vertical stripes.

The project started as a pattern sampler that creates a grid of four patterns across and thirteen patterns from top to bottom. By a combination of the way the loom is threaded and the ways the treadles are pushed, I could get many different patterns in one piece of fabric. For reasons I can’t explain, that makes me ever so happy.

For anyone REALLY interested, I got the pattern for this Rosepath Sampler from pages 16 and 17 in Marguerite Davison’s A Handweaver’s Pattern Book.

Once I was done the sampler portion of the project, I had enough warp left to make six dishtowels. I love dishtowels! I used a different treadling pattern on each one and played around with some different colors.

I’ll show a towel each day this week. On the seventh day, we won’t rest—I’ll show you the sampler, which turned out well enough to make me begin to feel like a real weaver!

I have lots of evidence of how kind and supportive you are, so don’t feel the need to comment every day on every towel!

A Week’s Worth of Handwovens from One Wonderful Warp: 3

IMG_4027Other elements of my life are infringing on my blog life this week. Instead of my usual very deep, incredibly insightful, humility-laden, and overly wordy posts, I am going to show you some glamour shots of the woven result of the long warp I’ve been thinking of as Rapunzel’s braid.

Day Three—Different, But No Less Classic

 

Ah, yes, red and white. What’s not to love? The vertical stripes of blue are a constant in all these towels, but this one has the white weft threads for brightness and a red band at both ends.

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Background:

The warp threads were 7.5 yards longs (a little less than 7 meters). They were mostly unbleached Cottolin, a mix of cotton and linen, with a few threads of dark blue to make vertical stripes.

The project started as a pattern sampler that creates a grid of four patterns across and thirteen patterns from top to bottom. By a combination of the way the loom is threaded and the ways the treadles are pushed, I could get many different patterns in one piece of fabric. For reasons I can’t explain, that makes me ever so happy.

For anyone REALLY interested, I got the pattern for this Rosepath Sampler from pages 16 and 17 in Marguerite Davison’s A Handweaver’s Pattern Book.

Once I was done the sampler portion of the project, I had enough warp left to make six dishtowels. I love dishtowels! I used a different treadling pattern on each one and played around with some different colors.

I’ll show a towel each day this week. On the seventh day, we won’t rest—I’ll show you the sampler, which turned out well enough to make me begin to feel like a real weaver!

I have lots of evidence of how kind and supportive you are, so don’t feel the need to comment every day on every towel!

A Week’s Worth of Handwovens from One Wonderful Warp: 2

IMG_4020Other elements of my life are infringing on my blog life this week. Instead of my usual very deep, incredibly insightful, humility-laden, and overly wordy posts, I am going to show you some glamour shots of the woven result of the long warp I’ve been thinking of as Rapunzel’s braid.

Day Two—The Classic, Brightened

I love the authentic look of unbleached, natural cotton and linen but look how using white for the weft (horizontal) threads brightens things up in this towel!

IMG_4022 IMG_4098Background:

The warp threads were 7.5 yards longs (a little less than 7 meters). They were mostly unbleached Cottolin, a mix of cotton and linen, with a few threads of dark blue to make vertical stripes.

The project started as a pattern sampler that creates a grid of four patterns across and thirteen patterns from top to bottom. By a combination of the way the loom is threaded and the ways the treadles are pushed, I could get many different patterns in one piece of fabric. For reasons I can’t explain, that makes me ever so happy.

For anyone REALLY interested, I got the pattern for this Rosepath Sampler from pages 16 and 17 in Marguerite Davison’s A Handweaver’s Pattern Book.

Once I was done the sampler portion of the project, I had enough warp left to make six dishtowels. I love dishtowels! I used a different treadling pattern on each one and played around with some different colors.

I’ll show a towel each day this week. On the seventh day, we won’t rest—I’ll show you the sampler, which turned out well enough to make me begin to feel like a real weaver!

I have lots of evidence of how kind and supportive you are, so don’t feel the need to comment every day on every towel!