Hand Quilt Along: Women’s Rights

On November 8, 2016, I watched our US election returns, fully expecting that we would be welcoming our first woman president.

As I watched, I embroidered on this block, with the words of the woman I was sure would be that president.

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I was stunned, horrified, and so, so disappointed when things worked out so differently, so cataclysmically wrong.

Disheartened, I stopped working on the quilt for a while but eventually knew that I needed, perhaps more than ever, to finish it.

And through the intervening two years, it’s given me some comfort to work on this. New women leaders have emerged while established standard bearers, including Hillary Rodham Clinton, continue to work toward keeping America America.

I admire Hillary Clinton. Nancy Pelosi. Elizabeth Warren.

I admire Kamala Harris and Kirsten Gillibrand and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and the other newly-elected women in government, every one of them, and Stacey Abrams and so many others.

I admire the women of Planned Parenthood and the ones who march for women’s rights, and women doctors and scientists and authors and artists, and every woman who has found her own way to say, “I am. I want my human rights.”

And, of course, I also admire the women who have found ways to express themselves when their expressive options were limited. And that brings us to my other quilt-in-progress.

I’ve started crocheting together the fusion squares.

I spent some time laying the squares out in patterns on my bed, trying to decide what worked. But I have almost no patience for that kind of work.

So I settled for a layout that put the all-white squares in the center, with more colorful ones bordering them. I stacked the squares up in order and had a plan, minimal though it was, and tucked all of the squares into a safe cabinet so I could take them out in order, to crochet.

The next day, I found that one of the cats (I’m looking at you, Gigi!) had finagled her way into the cabinet and wreaked havoc with my plan, minimal though it was. The squares were tossed every which way.

So, we’ll just have to wait and see how this turns out!


This Hand Quilt Along is an opportunity for hand quilters and piecers to share and motivate one another. We post every three weeks, to show our progress and encourage one another.  If you have a hand quilting project and would like to join our group contact Kathy at the link below.

KathyLoriMargaretKerryEmmaTracyDebConnieSusan,  Nanette,  EdithSharonKarrin, and Gretchen

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55 thoughts on “Hand Quilt Along: Women’s Rights

  1. Even if it’s a woman whose opinions and political goals you don’t admire, you have to celebrate the fact that she got there despite everything. Margaret Thatcher. Golda Meir. Indira Ghandi. Benazir Bhutto. They showed it can be done in entrenched, bigoted and misogynistic societies. And now as a shining light of good sense, compassion and leadership, Jacinda Ardern.

  2. I love our President and our Country. Women have had rights at least since 1920 and before my Grandmother did at the turn of the 1900’s, it just meant that they had to be strong enough to use the rights! I had the right to say “no” when there were unwanted advances! It just meant it took me longer to climb the ladder to a higher grade than those who gave in and said “yes”. I will probably be banned now – just like Twitter does to Conservative voices!

    • Not sure who would ban you–certainly not I! We share so many values–love of country, commitment to freedom of speech, the admiration of strong, outspoken women, the love of sewing. It’s okay for us not to agree about everything–we can still be pals.

  3. I like your fusion blocks. I’ve seen a couple of these and look forward to seeing how this turns out. I’m another conservative voice, and it’s good that we can both voice our opinions. I didn’t follow Betty Friedan OR Betty Crocker, but found my own way. I can admire you for what you do, without agreeing with you on everything. I wish the politicians would learn how to do that. =)

  4. I love both your quilts and am so pleased you are getting on with both. Cats! They do as they like and we love them for it! My daughter’s cat has taken to scraping her claws down the window when she wants to be let out. 😮

  5. Lovely quilting and the crocheted blocks are so beautiful! Glad Kitty didn’t ruin any…maybe Kitty was trying to find something!😄 of course you know that I don’t agree with your political views but I’m glad in-spite of that we are friends.❤️

    • The weird thing is that I had put a strong rubber band over the two little knobs or the cabinet doors, to be extra sure no cat could get in. And, yet, she persisted. 😉 Our political views are different, yes, but I think we share certain values that allow us to be friends–I hope we always are!

  6. Well, that’s got the name for the quilt sorted – and it’s a lovely name! This is my favourite of all the pieces you are working on – and I just know it will be spectacular no matter what Gigi has decided. Every time you post about this quilt I wish I lived closer to you!! ❤

  7. A list of impressive women, Kerry. I think an essence of them will permeate the quilt when it’s finished. And in the meantime, oh that finagling cat!

    • That list of impressive women can go on and on–so many women stepping up, all over the world. The cat is mostly very sweet . . . but she does have her naughty moments.

  8. Oh boy, I just started reading a book called “Women Talking” by Miriam Toews, and your quilt resonates with the themes of that work of fiction about the stiffling of women’s voices. Your cats seem to have prehensile paws to break into cabinets.

    • That sounds like a good book! I’ll make a note. I had fastened the knobs of the cupboard with a hefty rubber band, to be *sure* no one could get in. I really don’t know how she managed. And I wonder what else she is plotting . . .

  9. GigI persisted and managed to open that door despite your efforts with the elastic bands. And quiet enough that you didn’t even know she was doing it until it was too late. A smart, fonceful female who is determined to succeed. Can’t help but admire her.

    • She is all that and more! The little cabinet she got into is in our bedroom–I cannot understand why I didn’t hear her. She must’ve been in there, rifling around for a while, too, from the looks of things.

  10. Hello Kerry, You are one of those impressive women yourself! I am grateful for all the voices that encourage and support us all as equals. Beautiful work ( and words) as always, Kerry!

    • Funny–all I’m seeing, at this point, are the little mistakes I made as I was trying to figure all the steps out. Uneven crocheting (I didn’t know how to connect the end to the beginning), wonky edges on the squares, etc. Part of me wants to start over and apply what I’ve learned. Part of me (the bigger part!) just wants to finish!

    • Thanks, Judy. I have been lamenting my crochet skills these last few days. When I see all the squares together, it’s pretty obvious that I had no idea what I was doing for the first 50 or so!

  11. I love both your quilts Kerry; they are beautiful projects that express who you are. It doesn’t matter to me what our political views are, there are so many things that we have in common, it will take years to explore those topics adequately! 😘

    • My political views and values are a huge part of who I am. They influence my view of the world in obvious and subtle ways so of course they’re going to turn up here, just like your religious faith consistently crops up in your posts. Isn’t that what our blogs are, after all? Our means of expressing and sharing who we are? I’m glad you and I have so much in common and also that we see some things differently. It’s important to know, respect, and seek to understand all kinds of people!

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